Tui or Parson Bird Prosthemadera Novae Zealandiae. From: 'A history of the birds of New Zealand' by Walter Lawry Buller
ourheritage.ac.nz | OUR Heritage

Search using this query type:



Search only these record types:

Item
Collection
Simple Page

Advanced Search (Items only)

Traité Élémentaire de Chimie. 2nd ed. Vol. I

Files

Tags

Date

1793

Identifier

Health Sciences Historical Collection QDA L414

Type

Publisher

Paris: Cuchet

Abstract

Although Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794) did not discover oxygen, he did name it ‘oxygene’ (1778) – meaning ‘acid maker’. His greatest contribution to chemistry was to show that the processes of combustion and calcination result from the combination with oxygen. This was against contemporary thought by Joseph Priestley and others who advocated the ‘phlogiston’ theory. Lavoisier also introduced precise measurement into the study of chemistry in support of his theories. This illustration shows some of his apparatus for the collection and measurement of gases.

Citation

Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, “Traité Élémentaire de Chimie. 2nd ed. Vol. I,” ourheritage.ac.nz | OUR Heritage, accessed January 21, 2019, http://otago.ourheritage.ac.nz/items/show/11018.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.

Share this page